Category Archives: wingnuts

Hal Turner Arrested

In March of 2008, I wrote this post about white supremecist and right-wing internet talk show host Hal Turner, his friendship with Sean Hannity, and his threats on the lives of all three major presidential candidates at the time. I stated that I hoped the Secret Service was paying attention.

Well, it looks like he continued his bile and law enforcement finally took note:

Radio host Hal Turner — accused of hosting a website that incited Connecticut Catholics to “take up arms” and singling out two Connecticut lawmakers and a state ethics official — was taken into custody in New Jersey late today after state Capitol police obtained an arrest warrant for him.

Turner, who has been identified as a white supremacist and anti-Semite by several anti-racism groups, hosts an Internet radio program with an associated blog. Last week, the blog included a post that promised to release the home addresses of state Rep. Michael Lawlor, state Sen. Andrew McDonald and Thomas Jones of the ethics office.

“Mr. Turner’s comments are above and beyond the threshold of free speech,” Capitol police Chief Michael J. Fallon said in an e-mail announcing the warrant. “He is inciting others through his website to commit acts of violence and has created fear and alarm. He should be held accountable for his conduct.”

Snip.

“It is our intent to foment direct action against these individuals personally,” the blog stated. “These beastly government officials should be made an example of as a warning to others in government: Obey the Constitution or die.”

And, the post continued, “If any state attorney, police department or court thinks they’re going to get uppity with us about this; I suspect we have enough bullets to put them down too.”

You know, there’s a lot of hyperbole in talk radio and the blogosphere, but his words are so clear and so direct that they go way beyond hyperbole and enter into the realm of serious threats.

Free speech is one thing; incitement is another.

Wingnut Quote of the Day

Wow:

Deferring to people’s own pronunciation of their names should obviously be our first inclination, but there ought to be limits. Putting the emphasis on the final syllable of Sotomayor is unnatural in English (which is why the president stopped doing it after the first time at his press conference), unlike my correspondent’s simple preference for a monophthong over a diphthong, and insisting on an unnatural pronunciation is something we shouldn’t be giving in to.

If we pronouce someone’s name as they pronounce it, we’re giving in to something?